Monthly Archives: March 2008

Stark choices and positive futures: what climate change means for rich-nations’ way of life.

Neva Goodwin, for the Global Development and Environment Institute at Tufts University, has released a working paper titled:“An Overview of Climate Change: What does it mean for our way of life? What is the best future we can hope for?”.

The intention is that this paper will later develop into a book, and based on what we have so far, the book should be one excellent “answer” to the challenges we identified in “Enough Already – Part One”. At 28 pages of text, less footnotes, I recommend the paper as a compact, useful, positive read.

Some points I picked out:
Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Barry, climate change, economic analysis, social justice

Can New Zealand cope with the staggering environmental consequences of the dairy boom?

Dairy farming is big business in Aotearoa New Zealand these days. Given the payout of NZ$6.90 per kg made by Fonterra this year, and the average dairy cow producing 330kg of “milk solids”, each dairy cow earns NZ$2277. The commonest herd size, around 225 cows, earned NZ$512,000 this year. One of the larger herds of more than 1000 cows, of which there are around 270 in New Zealand at present, earned more than NZ$2.2 million (Livestock Improvement Corporation data, here).

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Aotearoa New Zealand, David, sustainability

Ecofeminism and the subsistence perspective: fostering cooperation, not competition

Ecofeminism sees parallels between the exploitation of nature and the exploitation of women, parallels that are understood in the context of patriarchy. One particularly vigorous ecofeminist analysis stems from the work of Claudia von Werlhof and Maria Mies.

Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under capitalism, David, green politics

The end of the golden weather: political choices in economic hard-times

There’s not a lot of economic good news out there at the moment, and even after the current credit-crisis passes us by, the storm-fronts of peak-oil and climate change look set to keep the economic weather looking bleak. In economic bad-times the essential nature of capitalism, the political choices that buttress it, the social costs it imposes on the most vulnerable, are much harder to gloss over and ignore – even in the societies of the rich-world.

Ironically, that is the good news, because it means a time of new choices – for compassion, fairness, for a sustainable future, for an end to poverty and oppression – is perhaps nearer than it has been for a long time. When we understand that we have a choice, we can make a choice.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Barry, economic analysis, social justice

Whole Living on a Budget

If you are looking for practical tips and gentle inspiration on living a ‘green’ lifestyle then you might like to head on over and have a look at Heather’s blog ‘Whole Living on a Budget‘.

Reducing Waste in Our Home is a good place to start on our challenge to say Enough Already! (1) & (2) and to make a 90% cut in our carbon emissions 🙂

Leave a comment

Filed under Barry, sustainability

25 lessons from the history of nonviolence

March 20, 2008, is the fifth anniversary of the US-led invasion of Iraq. The human cost of war is always beyond comprehension. The enormity of the financial cost of the war in Iraq, noted by Barry in a recent post, leaves me stunned.

What I can grasp, however, is the importance of keeping the spirit of nonviolence alive and strong – even here in Aotearoa New Zealand, so far from the devastation in the Middle East. And, perhaps, especially here in Aotearoa New Zealand, where the visionary Te Whiti o Rongomai and his people opposed colonisation by ploughing and planting expropriated land, and met invading forces with song and gifts of food.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under David, green politics, social justice

Some of the most expensive blood ever shed?

William D Hartung, writing for AsiaTimes Online breaks down the U.S. $3.5 billion per week cost of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

I’ve seen these kind of numbers before. It shouldn’t shock me. But it still does. It is such a colossal waste – outrageous in the original meaning of the word. Almost anything else would be a better use of those resources. Set up a thousand schools of interpretive modern dance, sponsor triathletes, or hey, end global poverty and invest in eco-technologies – do anything, but stop the war!

Leave a comment

Filed under Barry, economic analysis, social justice